The Jonesipedia

John Beaty Sr.Age: 59 years16611720

Name
John Beaty Sr.
Type
birth name
Given names
John
Surname
Beaty
Name suffix
Sr.
Also known as
John Beaty
Also known as
John Beaty
Birth about 1661 27
Emigration 1691 (Age 30 years)
MarriageSusannah AsfordbyView this family
November 7, 1691 (Age 30 years)
Kingston, Ulster County, New York, USA
Latitude: N41.881053 Longitude: W74.165337

Birth of a son
#1
Robert Beaty
about 1692 (Age 31 years)
Birth of a son
#2
William Beaty
June 9, 1695 (Age 34 years)
Birth of a son
#3
Charles Beaty
January 9, 1698 (Age 37 years)
Christening of a sonCharles Beaty
January 9, 1698 (Age 37 years)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Agnes Beaty
October 29, 1699 (Age 38 years)
Birth of a son
#5
John Beaty Jr.
March 1, 1701 (Age 40 years)
Birth of a son
#6
Thomas Beaty Sr.
September 14, 1703 (Age 42 years)
Christening of a sonThomas Beaty Sr.
September 14, 1703 (Age 42 years)
Birth of a son
#7
Edward Beaty
about 1705 (Age 44 years)
Christening of a daughterMartha Beaty
April 20, 1707 (Age 46 years)
Birth of a son
#8
James Beaty
September 11, 1709 (Age 48 years)
Birth of a son
#9
Henry Beaty
December 30, 1711 (Age 50 years)
Marriage of a childRobert BeatyBata MiddaghView this family
May 17, 1719 (Age 58 years)
Death of a daughterAgnes Beaty
about 1720 (on the date of death)

Death about 1720 (Age 59 years)
Will March 20, 1725 (5 years after death)
Unique identifier
9655D042DA8BD711874D0000C07217C72EE3

Last change June 17, 201608:48:47

by: Admin
Family with parents - View this family
father
Marriage: about 1659
3 years
himself
brother
Family with Susannah Asfordby - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: November 7, 1691Kingston, Ulster County, New York, USA
14 months
son
3 years
son
3 years
son
Charles Beaty
Birth: January 9, 1698 37 28Marbletown, Ulster County, New York, USA
Death: March 11, 1727Marbletown, Ulster County, New York, USA
22 months
daughter
16 months
son
3 years
son
2 years
son
2 years
daughter
2 years
son
James Beaty
Birth: September 11, 1709 48 39Ulster County, New York, USA
Death: January 29, 1742
2 years
son
Henry Beaty
Birth: December 30, 1711 50 42Ulster County, New York, USA
Death: about 1738

Will
UK Census transcript - Charles Bettie - Household .start_formatted_area. .end_formatted_area.
Note
Town of Marbletown -- Located in the central part of the county, it was one of the original five townships in 1683. Old soldiers of the Indian wars and veterans of the English Army who came in 1664 received grants there from the government in 1670 and settled in a village at what is now called North Marbletown, but soon scattered and took up the outlying land for farms, which in some cases they bought of the Indians. The town lands, covering the area of many of these purchases, were granted by Queen Anne to the town trustees, June 25,1703, and were reconveyed by them to settlers. Prices for land at this time were twelve pence an acre for lowland, six pence for upland. It has always been an excellent farming country. One hundred eleven slaves were listed in the town in 1755. A remarkably large proportion of the early names, such as Van De Mark, Schoonmaker, Krom, DeWitt, Bogart, Davis, Hardenbergh, Hasbrouck, Roosa are found in town today. Prominent early English families were the Ashfordbys, Gartons, Nottinghams, Pawlings and Brodheads. John Beatty, an Irishman of aristocratic lineage, married Susan Ashfordby and built the first house at Stone Ridge. Government by regularly elected town officials began at least as early as 1711. The regulation of matters relating to town property and perhaps some civil administration is recorded from 1703 onward. As in New Paltz and Rochester, the two governing bodies functioned simultaneously. The house where the annual town meetings were held for over a hundred years, since long before the Revolution, still stands on the Kingston-Ellenville highway and is thought to be the oldest town house still standing in New York State. It is called the Davis Tavern from its former owner, Isaac Davis, who built it about 1710. Stone Ridge is now a delightful village whose historic houses make the main street of great interest. (See elsewhere.) A modern industry, Sally Tock's (Cosmetics), Inc., occupies for its shop a small house over one hundred years old, and has a large mail order business in fine cosmetics, as well as a local one. The Shop in the Garden, whose proprietor is Katharine Hasbrouck, of the old Stone Ridge family, is a gift shop of unusual charm in an old stone house once the parsonage of the First Dutch Reformed Church. Tea, with toast, jam and cakes served either next to the shop or in her beautiful garden, is another attraction of the place, which is visited by shoppers from a wide area. The Leggett family have been prominent in town since Francis H. Leggett, grandson of Abraham Leggett, a tanner at Mt. Pleasant in Shandaken, bought a large estate there in the 1890s. Educational lecture courses by noted men and women were held every summer at the Leggett Casino for many years, and the family have always held "open house" to the neighborhood. In the summer of 1943, Mrs. Frances Leggett, daughter of Francis H. Leggett, put the inn at the disposal of the British Merchant Navy Committee of New York with complete accommodations for seamen. A number of Swamis from India were also guests on the estate, and lectures on India, with moving pictures, were made available to the residents of Stone Ridge without cost. Marbletown has a claim to being the second New York State capital, as the Committee of Safety, representing both branches of the government, met at the Andrew Oliver house in North Marbletown, October 19 to November 18, 1777, on which day it adjourned to Hurley. ************* ************* ************* There are many people called Beatty or Beattie in Ireland - an approximate estimate puts the number at four thousand. Eighty per cent of these are in northeast Ulster and are the descendants of Scottish settlers of the seventeenth century. The remainder are of native Gaelic-Irish origin and located much further south. Dealing with the Ulster families first, the spelling "Beatty" is most commonly found in counties Armagh and Tyrone while "Beattie" is the preferred form in counties Antrim and Down. While most modern histories of the Scottish family so called dismiss them as a minor member of the Clan MacBeth, in fact it is more likely that they were ultimately not of Scottish, but of Saxon English origin. The name is derived from Batty, Bate or Baty, a diminutive form of the personal name Bartholomew. Ancestors of the Scottish Border Beatties were Saxon refugees of the Norman Conquest, escaping from London or Northumberland in the eleventh century. In 1070, Princess Margaret (of the English House of Alfred) and her Saxon followers fled England from the onslaught of the Conquest. Their ships were driven north to Scotland and into the Firth of Forth where she was taken to the court of the king of Scotland, Malcolm III, who was living in his new palace in Dunfermline. Margaret married Malcolm and her followers settled in the Dumfriesshire area. The Beatties became one of the Border "Riding Clans" or Reivers. For over 350 years up to the end of the 16th century what are now Northumberland, Cumbria, The Scottish Borders, Dumfries and Galloway rang to the clash of steel and the thunder of hooves. Robbery and blackmail were everyday professions, raiding, arson, kidnapping, murder and extortion an accepted part of the social system. While the monarchs of England and Scotland ruled the comparatively secure hearts of their kingdoms, the narrow hill land between was dominated by the lance and the sword. The tribal leaders from their towers, the broken men and outlaws of the mosses, the ordinary peasants of the valleys, in their own phrase, 'shook loose the Border'. They continued to shake it as long as it was political reality, practising systematic robbery and destruction on each other. History has christened them the Border Reivers. They gave the words "blackmail" and "bereaved" to the English language. The stamp of the Reivers is still to be seen on the Border Lands - in it's architecture, culture and people. From the secretive fortified towns and farms to names that once struck fear into men's hearts - Armstrongs, Grahams, Kerrs, Nixons, Robsons, Beatties - the legacy of the Reivers remains. In 1455, the Beatties aided Red Douglas in the overthrow of Black Douglas at the battle of Arkinhom. As a reward King James II made several grants of land to the Beatties for their services to the Crown. This firmly established the family around Langholm and the Eskdale area. In 1504, Adam Batie was hanged by the criminal court at Dumfries for being part of the "king's rebels of Eskdale". In 1537 King James V stripped the Beatties of Eskdale of their lands and granted these to Robert Lord Maxwell. When Maxwell summoned the Beatties to acknowledge him as their feudal superior, the Beatties declared the royal grant was unjust. As the Beatties were mustering against him Ronald Beattie, the chief, gave Maxwell a fast, white mare to flee on. Maxwell shortly sold the lands to Scott, Warden of the Middle Marches. Scott and his men seized the Beattie possessions and divided up the Beattie estates. Maxwell, however, appealed to Scott to reward Ronald Beattie for saving Maxwell's life. As a result, Beattie was given the perpetual tenant-right of Watcarrick, one mile south of Eskdalemuir. Sir Walter Scott states that the Beattie descendants continued to occupy Watcarrick into the nineteenth century. Nonetheless, many of the family were dispersed following the events of 1537 and sought refuge in the north of Scotland, Ireland and Galloway. In 1544, Beatties and other Border clans came under the English. 116 Beatties were noted under the leadership of a Sander Beattie. In 1547 and 1548, under English leadership, the Lennoxes, Armstrongs, Beatties and Littles sacked and burned the town of Annan. In 1585, the Maxwells, Armstrongs, Scotts, Beatties and Littles attacked the Johnstone castle of Lockwood. In 1598, more Beatties were dispersed and the clan was effectively broken up. Some went to Northumberland in England from where they had migrated five hundred years earlier while others went to Ireland. In 1603, James VI finally broke the power of the Reivers although in 1618, the list of "last of the Border blackguards" included the family name of Beattie. Many of the family settled in the northern counties of Ireland after their dispersal and during the Plantation of Ulster. They are especially strong in Fermanagh where the name was ranked fifteenth in the list of most common surnames in that county in 1962. Betty is not uncommon as a variant in that county where MacCaffrey is recorded as having been used synonymously with those surnames as recently as 1890. In the rest of the Ireland, families of the name may be of the same origin or alternatively belong to families formerly called Betagh (also spelled Betaghe, Beatagh, Bettagh etc.) This early form of the name is now almost extinct, though the birth registration returns for 1890 show that it was then still to be found synonymous with Beatty, around Athlone. The variant Beytagh has been noted in a Dublin will of 1839. Betagh is one of the not very numerous class of Gaelic Irish surnames derived from an occupation - biadhtach is a word (formed from biadh, food) denoting a public victualler. It was originally used in a complimentary sense, conveying the idea of hospitality as well as function, but in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, when the Anglo-Norman power was at its zenith, the betaghs, or betagii as they were called in the official Latin of the time, were persons of very inferior status who were described as comparable to the villeins in feudal England. This, of course, applies only to the half of the country under effective Anglo-Norman rule, counties Dublin, Louth, Meath, Kildare, Kilkenny, Carlow, Wexford, part of Connacht and all Munster except Clare. The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries saw the reconquest by hibernicized Norman lords and Gaelic chiefs of the greater part of this territory and by 1500 the "English Pale" had shrunk to a small area in Counties Louth, Meath, Kildare and Dublin. The rest, including practically all Ulster, was still Gaelic and unconquered. It is unlikely that the word was at all widely adopted as a surname. At the period referred to references to it in official records are almost all to persons of some standing such as jurors and sureties in counties. Kildare and Meath, and there is only noted one Betagh in the contemporary lists of hibernici, felons and outlaws. Betagh had certainly become a name of consequence in Meath by the sixteenth century, for between 1570 and 1598 Betagh of Walterstown, Betagh of Rathalron, Betagh of Dunamore and Betagh of Moynalty all appear as gentlemen of that county, while William Betagh was chief serjeant of the adjoining county Cavan and Thomas Betagh was one of the gentlemen entrusted with the task of taking a muster of the inhabitants of Cavan in 1587. Betagh occurs there and in neighbouring Monaghan in the Inquisitions of the next generation. Thomas Betagh of Laurencetown and William Betagh of Ballicashe, on the Meath-Cavan border, were transplanted to Co. Roscommon. Six of the name (Betagh or Bytagh) appear in the lists of outlawed Jacobites, 1689 to 1702. Five places called Betaghstown - three in Meath, one in Westmeath and one in Kildare - are further evidence of their standing. Implying that the Betaghs were of Norman origin Woulfe mentions the fact that in early Hiberno-Norman records their personal names were Norman; this, however, is of little significance since in a list of outlaws in 1305 in which one Maurice Betagh appears, such forenames as Geoffrey, Henry, Nicholas, Richard, Simon and Thomas are as frequent with the many O's and Mac's cited as with men of Norman surnames. In modern times Father Thomas Betagh, S.J. (1769- 1811), who was born at Kells, Co. Meath, was notable for his activity in the revival of Catholic education at the end of the penal period. Thomas Edward Beatty (1801- 1872), P.R.C.S.I., whose mother was a Betagh, was of a Cavan family. Admiral David Beatty, Earl Beatty (1871-1936), famous as a naval commander in the First World War, came of a well-known family in Co. Wexford. Heraldry Beattie or Beatty of Scotland and Ulster: Argent a pale Sable surmounted of a sword Azure hilt and pommel Or between two keys wards outward of the third in fess, in chief two mascles Gules and another in base of the fourth. Crest: A star issuing from a crescent Or. Motto: lumen coeleste sequamur [let us follow the heavenly light]. Ref: B78/20 Betagh or Beatty (Ireland) Arms: Argent on a chevron between three estoiles Sable a mullet of the field, a chief Gules. Crest: A camel's head erased Argent bridled Gules.